Why is my dog’s one ear always dirty?

A waxy, yellow, or reddish-brown ear discharge can also be a sign your dog has an ear infection, which can be a result of allergies, mites, polyps, overproduction of ear wax, excessive bathing or swimming (which can leave too much moisture in the ears), or other problems.

How do you tell if your dog has ear mites or just dirty ears?

Signs Your Dog Has Ear Mites

  1. Intense ear scratching.
  2. Back-and-forth head shaking.
  3. Dark brown crumbly residue (like coffee grounds) in the ears.
  4. Painful sores on the head or outer ears from constant scratching.

How can I treat my dog’s ear infection without going to the vet?

If you’ve search online, you may find home remedies for dog ear infections like vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, or rubbing alcohol. These are all bad ideas, because they can irritate the inside of the ear and invite more infection. Sure, the acid in vinegar might kill yeast, but vinegar is mostly water.

How do you get black gunk out of a dog’s ear?

To clean the ears, tilt your dog’s head downward with one hand and squirt a gentle cleanser recommended by your veterinarian into the ear, filling the canal. Holding the ear closed, give it a nice massage, really squishing the cleanser around in there. That softens any gunk inside.

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How often should you clean your dog’s ears?

Wondering how often your dog’s ears need to be cleaned? In general, once per month is a good rule of thumb. Breeds with long, floppy ears or dogs who swim frequently may need to have their ears cleaned every other week, or even weekly. After bathing or swimming, be sure to properly dry your pup’s ears.

Can you flush a dog’s ear with water?

A range of ear cleaning products are available for dogs, but warm water will do the job in most cases. Use cotton wool balls – don’t be tempted to use Q-tips as these can damage a dog’s ear.

What does a dog ear infection look like?

The ears often become red and inflamed and develop an offensive odor. A black or yellowish discharge commonly occurs. In chronic cases the ears may appear crusty or thickened and the ear canals often become narrowed (stenotic) due to the chronic inflammation.

Dog life